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  • Effects of feeding 2 rumen-protected choline sources during the transition period on Holstein dairy cows performance and blood metabolites

    During the first weeks of lactation, dairy cows typically experience negative energy balance, leading to the mobilization of body reserves. This predisposes early lactating cows toward metabolic diseases, such as fatty liver syndrome and ketosis.
  • Assessing intestinal health. In vitro and ex vivo gut barrier models of farm animals: benefits and limitations

    The concept of “gut health" is not well defined, but this concept has begun to play a very important role in the field of animal science. However, a clear definition of GIT health and the means by which to measure it are lacking. In vitro and ex vivo models can facilitate these studies, creating well-controlled and repeatable conditions to understand how to improve animal gut health.
  • Assessing intestinal health. In vitro and ex vivo gut barrier models of farm animals: benefits and limitations

    The concept of “gut health" is not well defined, but this concept has begun to play a very important role in the field of animal science. However, a clear definition of GIT health and the means by which to measure it are lacking. In vitro and ex vivo models can facilitate these studies, creating well-controlled and repeatable conditions to understand how to improve animal gut health.
  • Assessing intestinal health. In vitro and ex vivo gut barrier models of farm animals: benefits and limitations

    The concept of “gut health" is not well defined, but this concept has begun to play a very important role in the field of animal science. However, a clear definition of GIT health and the means by which to measure it are lacking. In vitro and ex vivo models can facilitate these studies, creating well-controlled and repeatable conditions to understand how to improve animal gut health.
  • Assessing intestinal health. In vitro and ex vivo gut barrier models of farm animals: benefits and limitations

    The concept of “gut health" is not well defined, but this concept has begun to play a very important role in the field of animal science. However, a clear definition of GIT health and the means by which to measure it are lacking. In vitro and ex vivo models can facilitate these studies, creating well-controlled and repeatable conditions to understand how to improve animal gut health.
  • Heat stress develops with increased total-tract gut permeability, and dietary organic acid and pure botanical supplementation partly restores lactation performance in Holstein dairy cows

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of heat stress (HS) conditions and dietary organic acid and pure botanical (OA/PB) supplementation on gut permeability and milk production.
  • Development of an in vitro model to study intestinal integrity during an E. coli K88 challenge

    Post-weaning diarrhoea is а striking issue of the pig industry and its onset is primarily associated with Escherichia coli К88 (Е. coli). То assess the effectiveness of bioactives in preventing the damages exerted bу the pathogen, the aim of this study was to set-up an in vitro model to mimic an Е. coli challenge on intestinal cells.
  • Effects of two rumen-protected choline sources during transition period on Holstein dairy cows performance

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of two sources of rumen-protected choline (RPC) supplemented from 21 d pre- to 35 d postpartum.
  • Evaluation of a rumen-protected methionine product for lactating dairy cows at 2 concentrations of dietary crude protein

    This study evaluated the effect of a supplemental rumen-protected Met product (Timet; VETAGRO S.p.A.; Reggio Emilia, Italy) on lactation performance and rumen measures of dairy cows fed 2 concentrations of dietary CP.
  • In situ rumen degradability and in vitro intestinal digestibility of rumen-protected methyl donors and lysine

    Rumen degradation and intestinal digestibility of rumen-protected (RP) methyl donor and lysine products vary. Our objectives were to evaluate the in situ rumen degradability and in vitro intestinal digestibility of 4 RP products containing choline chloride, dl-methionine, betaine, and/or l-lysine in a triglyceride matrix.
  • Effects of supplementing rumen protected methionine on performance of primiparous dairy cows during Presynch-Ovsynch protocol

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effects of supplementing three levels of rumen-protected methionine (RPM) at two levels of protein (14 vs. 16% CP) on reproductive and productive performance in primiparous lactating dairy cows during timed artificial insemination (TAI) protocol.
  • Effect of supplemental rumen-protected methionine on reproduction and production of Awassi ewes

    Feeding a rumen-protected methionine (RPM) supplement improved milk production in lactating dairy cows, lactating goats, or ewes. In this study, we hypothesize that feeding RPM would enhance reproduction and production in Awassi ewes.
  • How to improve colostrum quality

    Ruminants placenta avoids immunoglobulins transfer from the mother to the fetus (passive immunity). Calves are not protected against infections until they develop their own active immunity, except for antibodies received through colostrum.
  • A blend of microencapsulated organic acids and botanicals reduces necrotic enteritis via specific signaling pathways in broilers

    The objective was to evaluate the efficacy of AviPlus®P (a microencapsulated blend of 25 % citric and 16.7% sorbic, 1.7% thymol, and 1% vanillin ) to reduce clinical NE and determine the signaling pathways associated with any changes.
  • Effects of microencapsulated methionine on milk production and manure nitrogen excretions of lactating dairy cows

    The study objective was to determine the effects of rumen-protected methionine (Met) by microencapsulation (RPM) on amino acid (AA) supply to the udder, milk production, and manure nitrogen (N) losses of dairy cows.